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Keywords
dependency injection, adrianhelvik, dependency, container, injection
License
ISC
Install
npm install @adrianhelvik/container@3.2.0

Documentation

@adrianhelvik/container

Build Status Coverage Status

A non-hacky dependency container with lazily created dependencies.

API

Container.prototype.provider(name: string, provider: function)

Adds a new value to the container in the form of a provider function. The provider is called with the dependencies in the container.

Container.prototype.constant(name: string, value: any)

Adds a new value to the container in the form of a constant value.

Container.prototype.invoke(fn: function)

Invoke the given function with the dependencies in the container. This method creates a new container, so that we can use the provide method as well.

const container = new Container()
container.provider('message', ({ who }) => 'Hello ' + who)
container.constant('who', 'world')

container.invoke(({ message }) => {
  console.log(message) // logs 'Hello world'
})

Injected: invoke

The invoke function is injected. It allows you to invoke another function with the dependencies of the container as the first parameter. A new child container is created to allow providing scoped dependencies.

Injected: provide

This method lets you provide a dependency into the container. It calls .constant(k, v) on the current container.

container.invoke(({ invoke, provide }) => {
  provide('message', 'Hello on the outside')

  invoke(({ invoke, provide }) => {
    provide('message', 'Hello on the inside')

    invoke(({ message }) => {
      console.log(message) // Hello on the inside
    })
  })

  invoke(({ message }) => {
    console.log(message) // Hello on the outside
  })
})

Container.prototype.extend()

Create a container that extends from the current one. Dependencies from the child container are preferred. The child container will lookup dependencies in the parent container if no matching dependency is found in the parent container.

const container = new Container()
container.provider('foo', () => 42)
const childContainer = container.extend()
childContainer.provider('bar', () => 43)

childContainer.invoke(({ foo, bar }) => {
  expect(foo).toBe(42)
  expect(bar).toBe(43)
})

childContainer.provider('foo', () => 44)

childContainer.invoke(({ foo }) => {
  expect(foo).toBe(44)
})

Container.prototype.keys()

Returns the names of the dependencies in the current container. Does not include the keys of any parent container.

container.provider('foo', () => 42)
const childContainer = container.extend()
childContainer.provider('bar', () => 43)

expect(childContainer.keys()).toEqual(['bar'])

Container.prototype.get(key)

Gets a given property from the container.

const container = new Container()
container.provider('foo', () => 42)
expect(container.get('foo')).toBe(42)

Container.prototype.has(key)

Checks if a property exists in the container. Does not invoke provider functions and returns true even if the value in the container is undefined. This checks for the value in parent containers as well.

const container = new Container()
let called
container.provider('foo', () => {
  called = true
  return undefined // Being explicit here
})
expect(container.has('foo')).toBe(true)
expect(called).toBe(false)

Container.prototype.hasOwn(key)

Checks if a property exists in the container. Does not invoke provider functions and returns true even if the value in the container is undefined. Does NOT check parent containers for the key.

const container = new Container()
const child = container.extend()
container.constant('foo', 42)
expect(container.hasOwn('foo')).toBe(true)
expect(child.hasOwn('foo')).toBe(false)

Cyclic dependencies

Cyclic dependencies can be resolved with the invoke function. It is however a very good idea to prevent cyclic dependencies in the first place.

An important note here is that the provider function must return before invoking the cyclic dependency. This could be done either as in the example below, by making the values in the container be promises, or by having the values be functions, where invoke is used in the body of the returned function.

But as a general rule of thumb: Avoid cyclic dependencies

Good example

container.provider('foo', async ({ invoke }) => {
  await new Promise(resolve => setTimeout(resolve))
  const bar = await invoke(({ bar }) => bar)
  return { bar }
})

container.provider('bar', async ({ invoke }) => {
  await new Promise(resolve => setTimeout(resolve))
  const foo = await invoke(({ foo }) => foo)
  return { foo }
})

container.invoke(async ({ foo, bar }) => {
  foo = await foo
  bar = await bar
  expect(foo.bar).toBe(bar)
  expect(bar.foo).toBe(foo)
})

Bad example

container.provider('foo', ({ bar }) => {
  return { bar }
})

container.provider('bar', ({ foo }) => {
  return { foo }
})

expect(() => {
  container.get('foo')
}).toThrow(/Maximum call stack size exceeded/)

Example

import Container from '@adrianhelvik/container'

const container = new Container()

container.provider('foo', () => {
  console.log('foo injected')
  return 10
})

container.constant('bar', 'Hello world')

// The dependency 'foo' is now injected into
// the function and the provider for foo is
// called.
container.invoke(({ foo, bar }) => {
  assert.equal(foo, 10)
  assert.equal(bar, 'Hello world')
})