Package Description


Keywords
cross-platform, dotnet, dotnet-tool, git, gitversion, semantic, semver, version, versioning
License
MIT
Install
Install-Package repo-version -Version 0.2.6.15

Documentation

repo-version

Automatic versioning for git repositories based tags, and the number of commits since the last tag.

package version downloads
repo-version Nuget Nuget

Quick Start

dotnet tool install -g repo-version

or

dotnet tool update -g repo-version

or

./build.sh --target Install

For more information about building from source please view the Contributing guide.

You need to be somewhere within a git repository to run repo-version. Alternatively, you can provide a path as an argument.

Let's say you have branched off of master at tag 1.2.2.1 and created a branch named bugfix/fix-null-reference. During your development you currently have 2 commits on your feature branch. And you have some local changes that you have not yet committed.

run repo-version to calculate the current version

repo-version
1.2.3.2-fix-null-reference+1

or for more verbose output

repo-version -o json
{
    "SemVer": "1.2.3.2-fix-null-reference+1",
    "Major": "1",
    "Minor": "2",
    "Patch": "3",
    "Commits": "2",
    "IsDirty": true,
    "Label": "fix-null-reference"
}

Because you have local changes that have not yet been committed the version is considered dirty and appends the +1 to the calculated version to indicate that there are additional changes.

For this example we have decided that we want to keep those changes, so we commit those to the git history.

repo-version
1.2.3.3-fix-null-reference

Note that the number of commits went up, and the dirty indicator was dropped.

Now, let's say that your branch is ready to be merged, and you use a merge commit strategy. This will add 1 more commit.

git checkout master
git merge bugfix/fix-null-reference --no-ff

Now on the master branch we run repo-version again.

$ repo-version
1.2.3.4

Tagging

Tags indicate to repo-version that the current patch is official, and versions should begin counting toward the next patch. It will be typical to branch from master, and merge back to master, and tag each one of those merges with the official version.

So, with our example above let's say you are ready to complete the 1.2.3.x release. We accomplish that with a git tag. repo-version has built in support to help with this.

repo-version tag

This will apply the current version as a tag. The next commit will be be automatically bumped to 1.2.4.1

Versioning Rules

Each of the 4 numbers in the version mean something specific. This slightly extends the recommendation from semver.

{major}.{minor}.{patch}.{commits}-{label}

The label indicates that the version is a pre-release version. This should be ommited on full release versions.

By default repo-version will begin a new repository with a version of 0.1.0.x, where x is the number of commits in the git history. Applying a release version tag to the repository will reset the commits and increment patch.

Pre-Release Labels

pre-release version tags will not increase the version numbers in any way, however the label will persist on main-line branches until a new tag changes or drops the label. Take a look at the Configuration section for more details on controlling the default label.

Incrementing Major and Minor Versions

repo-version will respect version tags. So, any manually applied tag will increase the version to whatever the tag says it is. However, it is recommended that the major and minor versions be controlled in the repo-version.json file. (see Configuration).

While you are free to modify repo-version.json directly, there are convenience commands provided to assist with this task.

Increment minor version:

repo-version minor

This will increment the minor version by 1 in the config file.

Increment major version:

repo-version major

This will increment the major version by 1, and reset the minor version to 0 in the config file.

Configuration

example repo-version.json located at the root of your git repository

{
  "major": 0,
  "minor": 1,
  "branches": [
    {
      "regex": "^master$",
      "defaultLabel": "",
      "mainline": true
    },
    {
      "regex": "^support[/-].*$",
      "defaultLabel": "",
      "mainline": true
    },
    {
      "regex": ".+",
      "defaultLabel": "{BranchName}",
      "mainline": false
    }
  ]
}

This file can be generated by running the following command

repo-version init

The branches section is an ordered list of branch configs. repo-version will do a Regex match against each branch config to find the rules that should apply to the current branch. The first rule that matches will be used. The matching rule will be used to determine the label.

The defaultLabel indicates which label should be applied to commits after a release version. So, for example:

You have just released v3.2.4.9 of a nuget package you maintain. Your repo-version.json looks like this:

{
  "major": 3,
  "minor": 2,
  "branches": [
    {
      "regex": "^master$",
      "defaultLabel": "alpha",
      "mainline": true
    },
    {
      "regex": "^support[/-].*$",
      "defaultLabel": "",
      "mainline": true
    },
    {
      "regex": ".+",
      "defaultLabel": "{BranchName}",
      "mainline": false
    }
  ]
}

This configuration specifies that by default the master branch should have the alpha label. The next commit after the 3.2.4.9 tag would be calculated to be 3.2.5.1-alpha. The alpha label will persist until the repository is tagged with a different label.

Example:

The last tag on master is 3.2.5.67-alpha. There have been 34 additional commits and now the project is now ready to be promoted to a beta status.

Tag the repository with the current version, and change the label to beta

repo-version tag -l beta

This will tag the repository with a beta label and will produce this version 3.2.5.101-beta.

It should be noted that you cannot apply multiple tags to the same commit. So, you will need to make at least an empty commit in order to change the label.

This strategy should be followed to specify alpha, beta, rc, etc... labels until you are ready to drop the pre-release label all-together. So, for our example, if there have been 21 additional commits since the beta tag, and we are ready to release this version we would run the following command.

repo-version tag -l ""

This will apply the 3.2.5.122 tag, and that will complete the 3.2.5.x version. If your branch config sepcifies alpha as the defaultLabel the next version would be 3.2.6.x-alpha, where x is the number of commits since the 3.2.5.122 tag.

Contributing

PLEASE! Any contribution would be very much appreciated. Head over to the Contributing page for more information.

Roadmap

Version Description
0.1 Proof of concept phase. General algorithm works, but still working out the interface
-> 0.2 Committed to keep the interface from 0.1. Squashing bugs, and working on docs
0.3 Interface might change from 0.2. It's unclear yet if this will be compatible with 0.2