docker helper


Keywords
docker
License
GPL-3.0
Install
pip install wrfy==0.8.0

Documentation

wrfy /wharfie/

minimal CLI tool to smooth your docker local dev experience

wrfy provides a dozen or so commands to automate common operations on a docker development or CI host. Want to pull all images? Delete images matching a regexp? Clean up dangling volumes? You've come to the right place.

installation

$ pip3 install wrfy

wrfy commands

doctor

wrfy doctor will check your docker host for common issues. The checks are:

  • containers running from an old version of the image they were launched from. for example, if you were to do docker run -it alpine:latest /bin/sh, leave that container going, and then pull a newer version of alpine:latest, wrfy will let you know that your Alpine container is running from an old image.
  • dangling volumes. dangling volumes, which are not attached to a container.
  • dangling images. dangling images, which do not have a tag.
  • stopped containers. docker hosts can build up a large number of stopped containers whose purpose was ephemeral.

Each check suggests a wrfy tool to address each particular issue identified.

kill-all

wrfy kill-all will kill all running containers. It asks for confirmation, unless --force is passed as an argument.

pull-all

wrfy pull-all will pull all images present on the docker host. This is very useful when you want to make sure everything is up to date.

rm-matching

wrfy rm-matching <pattern> will remove containers matching the provided glob pattern. If -e is passed, the pattern is interpreted as a regular expression. It asks for confirmation, unless --force is passed as an argument.

A useful command is wrfy rm-matching -e '^[a-z]+_[a-z]+$', which will remove all containers with a name comprised of two words seperated by an underscore. This will match containers with names automatically generated by docker.

rm-stopped

wrfy rm-stopped will remove all containers which are not running. It is somewhat of a blunt instrument, you might want to use rm-matching instead. It asks for confirmation, unless --force is passed as an argument.

rmi-dangling

wrfy rmi-dangling will remove all dangling images - images which haven't got a name. It asks for confirmation, unless --force is passed as an argument.

rmi-matching

wrfy rmi-matching <pattern> will remove images matching the provided glob pattern. If -e is passed, the pattern is interpreted as a regular expression. It asks for confirmation, unless --force is passed as an argument.

A useful command to clean up after docker-compose is wrfy rmi-matching -e '^[a-z]+_[a-z]+:latest$', which will remove all containers with a name comprised of two words seperated by an underscore, and a tag of latest. Such images probably came from docker-compose.

rmv-dangling

wrfy rmv-dangling will remove all dangling volumes - volumes not attached to any container. It asks for confirmation, unless --force is passed as an argument.

scrub

wrfy scrub chains together rm_stopped, rmi_dangling, and rmv_dangling. It asks for confirmation at each stage, unless --force is passed as an argument.